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Dr Ibrahim Umar Mohammed is a molecular plant virologist with 17 years of research experience in plant-virus-insect interactions, especially those involving Geminiviruses, potyviruses and their whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci, infecting cassava, vegetables and other staple food crops in the tropics. He began his research career in Nigeria in 1996 and had obtained his first Degree in Agriculture from Usman Danfodiyo University, Sokoto. He then moved to the Natural Resources Institute (NRI) at the University of Greenwich in 2006 to undertook his MSc on plant protection, where he investigated the effect of inter-cropping system on the control of pest and diseases, which are causing devastating losses, famine and food shortages to subsistent farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa. Following completion of his MSc in 2007, Dr Ibrahim joined the university of Greenwich as a PhD student (in molecular plant virology). After completion of his PhD, Dr Ibrahim returned home to Nigeria in 2012 and joined Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero (KSUSTA) as a senior scientist/lecturer.

Dr Ibrahim has supervised many undergraduate final year projects, serve as visiting senior lecturer and served as internal examiner to some postgraduate students’ theses in both UDUs and BUK. He has attended many national and international conferences, presented papers at various seminars and training workshops and has published 16 peer-reviewed articles in reputable national and international Journals.

Dr Ibrahim employs multi-disciplinary research, from field epidemiology to molecular biology and tissue culture to functional genomics, to better understand plant-virus-vector relationships and mechanisms of disease resistance to enable developing improved disease control strategies. He was awarded the Raymond/Roger Hull prize for best presentation at the International Plant Virus Symposium of the Association of Applied Biology 2012. He has also developed robust low-cost diagnostic tests and virus indexing for CBSVs and cassava mosaic viruses, which are adapted in several laboratories in UK and Africa.

 


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